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GATW Guest Writer

by:
October 23rd, 2007

This Almost makes up for Forces of Nature and Bounce

Gone Baby Gone is one of those films where you have to wonder about its journey to the screen. It’s easy to understand the studios wanting to green light another project based on a novel by Dennis Lehane, the author behind the critical hit Mystic River. The directing of the film by Ben Affleck is not as easy to explain or understand. The former A-List actor has never directed before, or done anything in his performances to make you think he is capable of handling a project demanding of such a skillful and mature hand. However, Affleck has won an Oscar for writing and co-wrote the adaptation of Gone Baby Gone. I suppose the people involved in producing the film weighed the ability Affleck showed as a writer with Good Will Hunting against the lack of talent Affleck has shown in his film performances and decided to take the risk.

Gone Baby Gone is a carefully crafted noir set in Beantown that is enhanced by the intelligent decisions made by the director. The actors playing most of the secondary characters in the film look and talk exactly like the people that would live in the film’s neighborhood; this casting greatly enhances the film’s realism and helps the audience accept some of the secondary character’s quirky behaviors.

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Chase Whale

by:
October 19th, 2007

Our very first video review:

GATW Guest Writer

by:
October 19th, 2007

The Snow is such a Lovely Shade of Red.

Within the horror genre lives several different sub-genres. Some of these types of horror are well known and discussed and some are not. There is your traditional horror, which is heavy on the suspense and the subtext. Next you got your postmodern and supernatural horror. Then there is the type of horror I lovingly refer to as brutal horror. A sub-genre I named and created in my head. These films are not focused on creating suspense in the traditional sense. Instead, they scare you by putting their characters through unimaginable pain and torment and making you witness the whole ordeal. The audience gets to watch as these functioning members of society are hunted and terrorized by monsters (supernatural or human) to the point where they are no longer members of a modern society, but creatures using all their instinct and strength to survive. For the most part I would consider 30 Days of Night a brutal horror film, and I mean that as a very sincere compliment.

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GATW Guest Writer

by:
October 15th, 2007

extremely-loud-incredibly-close.jpg

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close By Jonathan Safran Foer

Synopsis:
Oskar Schell is an inventor, Francophile, tambourine player, Shakespearean actor, jeweler, pacifist. He is nine years old. And he is on an urgent, secret search through the five boroughs of New York to find the lock that fits a mysterious key belonging to his father, who died in the attacks on the World Trade Center.

Review:
When I first picked this book up off of the shelf and flipped through the pages, I thought to myself "this is going to be interesting." The pages were filled with photos of doorknobs, colorful scribbles and unintelligible text. And for some reason it excited me.
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GATW Guest Writer

by:
October 14th, 2007

When it comes to movies, the term legal thriller has always sounded like an oxymoron to me. The term legal reminds me of long documents full of terms and conditions I don’t understand, and even if I did understand them I still wouldn’t care about what they were saying. In short, the legal world is boring to me. Thrillers are anything but boring; they are full of exciting elements like car crashes, backstabbing, and sex. Which is why I tend to scoff when I hear a movie described as a legal thriller. Even with this skepticism, I still went to see the 10:00 am showing of Michael Clayton, a legal thriller. (more...)

GATW Guest Writer

by:
October 12th, 2007

Stupid title, stupid movie.

Prologue

Before getting to my first review, I would like to say a few things regarding horror films. I love horror films. I have loved them since my Papa Bear first exposed me to their glory, by showing me Aliens at age seven and The Howling at age eight. The films terrified me. They also created a bloodlust that could not be satisfied. Throughout my childhood and early adult years, I have seen many horror films hoping to satisfy that bloodlust, for at least a moment.

Lately, the films the horror genre has churned out have been stupid, lacking soul, or made for 11-year-olds having slumber parties. With the decline in truly good horror films and the rise of remakes, prequels, and just plain bad movies with no merit, it appears as if the horror genre may be performing its death rattle.
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